The Park Meadows Pilates Story

How we began our journey

“We can’t cover that service”, said the young woman on the other end of the phone, delivering her pronouncement with conviction and finality.

“Why not?” I asked.

“Because your patient’s diagnosis is whiplash and neck pain”, she replied.

“So?” I said.

“Well, this treatment code I’m looking at doesn’t match the diagnosis code.”

“How’s that?” I said, starting to get irritated.

“Well”, she said, “in your notes, it says you gave her therapeutic exercise for core stability and abdominal strengthening”.

“Yes, that’s right”.

“Well, the diagnosis is neck pain”, she repeated.

“Yes”. I could see exactly where this was going, and I wasn’t going to make it easy for her.

“Our company won’t cover treatment for the low back—this is a neck pain diagnosis”.

There it was. Again.

“I had been bumping into this wall for years. Someone in an office hundreds, possibly thousands of miles away, was telling me how I was permitted to treat MY patients.”

Based on what?

 

A set of numbers—diagnosis and treatment codes. With no knowledge or personal interaction, this person was telling me what I could and could not do with my patient.

“Well”, I said, mimicking her [I’m embarrassed to admit this now] “What the hell do you think holds up her head?”

I was sick and tired of having this conversation. Trying to explain how “everything is connected” to an insurance clerk hundreds or thousands of miles away was exhausting. And a complete waste of time and energy. The poor clerk didn’t make these decisions—the insurance company did. I knew I couldn’t fight them any more.

I was done.

After that phone call, yet another call in an endless steam of calls where I felt my patient was on the losing end of their own health and recovery, I made a plan.

One way or another, I was going to get out of clinical PT practice. I had no idea at the time how I was going to do it. Or what I was going to do. I just knew I had to do something different.

I wasn’t going to change the system I’d been working in for the last 10 years since moving to Denver.

Staying in the system was affecting my physical, mental, emotional and spiritual health in extremely harmful ways.

I was not the person I wanted to be, for myself, my family, or my community. I wasn’t growing and thriving—I knew I could do better.

I decided to make it my mission to figure out a way to integrate quality, whole-body, mindful movement practices into my personal and professional life—and to find a place to provide it to others.

Almost a decade later, in 2005, and after a series of struggles and triumphs, The Dream was realized and Park Meadows Pilates & Physical Therapy was born.

The seed was planted with one phone conversation in 1996.

This year, 2015,  Park Meadows Pilates & PT celebrates 10 years of doing it our way. We continue to push the envelope, challenging ourselves to help our clients develop a deeper understanding and relationship with their body so they can live confidently and vibrantly.

“One way or another, I was going to get out of clinical PT practice. I had no idea at the time how I was going to do it. Or what I was going to do. I just knew I had to do something different.”

Lindy Royer Circle250

Lindy Royer, PT, PMA-CPT

Founder, Park Meadows Pilates & Physical Therapy